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20130126
20130203
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
by creating words. 1840, much later, but he writes -- i'm sorry, 1820, he writes a letter to john adams, and he says, you know, our duty, our duty as americans is to knee control eyes. so jefferson creating all these words, and some of them are -- he creates the word ottoman. not for the empire, but for the not stool. he creates -- for the foot stool. there's 114 words now in the oxford english dictionary which are credited to jefferson either as the coiner or the introducer, the first one to actually bring them into the, into the mainstream. and the list is really sort of fascinating. um, pedicure is his word. pussy -- i'm sorry, pussy, that's teddy roosevelt. monoaccurate, meaning a person who believes in a single rule. the one that becomes the most egregious to the purists and the language police is the word "belittle." he creates the word belittle. he knows what he's up to. he knows he's creating something that's going to be very disturbing. noah webster himself just loves the word. in fact, one of noah webster's teachers at yale writes noah webster a letter about the word "belittle
in that period of time to improve the well-being of the united states with this investment consumption. >> john, when we were speaking the folder your talk, he mentioned to me the extent of the fred's involvement in the micromanagement. just give us a couple examples. it was so mind-boggling. >> people do not realize how bad dogfighting case because it is i believe a very conscious effort to take over the financial system in the united states. if you want to control an economy, control the allocation of capital. the way to do this safely is in the background. socialism does not work if everybody could see the government run businesses fail. if you can blame somebody, then it's a great way to do it. credit allocation in the united states, like the federal reserve acyclic controlling. they haven't made any big as yet, but the rolling them out. the so-called consumer compliance is credit allocation. not only can they make banks, keep banks that can make you offer products, kind of like subprime lending. you're going to see subprime consumer lending so the government can force allocation. they can
? first, you interviewed the people who are still alive. john connolly himself was very helpful to me. he had a great ranch in south texas with a stable of quarter horses, used to come to the guest house where i would stay very early in the morning, 5:30 or 6:00 and we would go and sit on the top railing of the fence watching the mexicans exercise the quarter horses and he would tell me about -- he answered almost every question that i asked about anything in johnson's career but took me through the assassination in great detail. among the things he said was everybody thought when they heard the shots that with the motorcycle backfire or that it was a balloon going off for a firecracker but he said i was a hunter. i knew the instant i heard that it was the crack of a hunting rifle. i talked to everyone who was with lyndon johnson in the hospital, still alive, who was in hospital with lyndon johnson, congressman jack brooks, lyndon johnson's secretary, kennedy, secretary, i have learned there always seems to the other sources that have been overlooked. when i was doing this, suddenly i cam
.com/booktv. now on booktv, john allison argues that government incentives and regulation caused the 2008 claps and says that to improve the economy, we need to opt pure free-market policies. it is about 50 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. it is a pleasure to be here. i would like to congratulate heritage on the success that they have had. we did it. this is a pattern we have going forward and the purpose is to talk about my book, which is "the financial crisis and the free market cure." people ask me my i wrote the book. the basic answer is i thought it would be interesting to have somebody who knew what he was talking about write about thinking. because if you look to the academics to some degree, they don't know what they are talking about. [laughter] i think it's very important to undo a myth. these myths become destructive. the method they created is that it was caused by the deregulation on wall street. welcome to the simple fact is that this was not deregulated. we have the privacy act and we were mis-regulated, not deregulated. i have been working with wall street for 40 years and it'
at the center of this story in some respects because it's thanks to bp and john brown, the longtime sew -- ceo of bp, that i actually got into this business. and so at the beginning of the 1990s i was with john brown flying into russia as he sent the first teams of bp people to look over various possibilities. and we went to places like west siberia where a new democratic government had taken over in the wake of a coup or near coup. of course, we remember the late period of bp and of john brown which was less happy, but in those days he was really the embodiment of the entrepreneur and true. and his vision was that russia was the place to be, but it happened in a way that he never imagined. it happened because through a combination of flukes and circumstances he was able to gain for bp access to one of the prime developed areas, one of what they call in the oil business brown field areas of russia. and in particular the one field that had been the prime field in soviet days called -- [speaking in native tongue] he was able to get an opportunity to gain control of that field in that area and th
and daniel webster and john c. calhoun and others were debating. imagine a much smaller senate chamber crowded with men who hated each other, although two although, a room reeking of cigar smoke, smelling of gas from gas lamps. carpets with spittoons scattered here and there misfitting in one direction or another, and it intends, congested atmosphere with political man and a great gladiatorial arena of america. postcode was there on the compromise? >> guest: henry clay had been in retirement. he was called out of retirement in kentucky to take charge of an attempt to create some kind of a compromise. he was not missed a great compromise their for the compromise of 1820, missouri compromise and most of the 1833 compromise over south carolina's nullification of federal law. henry clay was a grand, remarkable man i never wanted to say no when he was invited to speak to the center political intentions. so he returned to washington and let the debate for seven months, attempting to persuade congressmen for the right and left, south and north to agree to a grand compromise that would solve t
as john mccain said you can account for the 9% popularity of congress during the debt ceiling crisis by blood relatives and paid staffers and we felt that by focusing on the converse, we could both diagnose the problem and give some prescriptions for how to overcome it. its chemical is one of those prescriptions? >> one of those prescriptions is very simple which is congressmen need exercise, leadership by mixing mind sets by putting aside the campaign mindset long enough to govern and adopting the compromising mind set. in order to do that they need relationships so they can spend more time in washington and less time raising money and people will say that's going to hurt them in the next election but we say that the politicians didn't enter politics just to stand on principle. very few people said politicians were entrusted to politics because they were the most principled people in the population they were in the public's because they want the government that takes the leadership and relationships. we have a phrase that is familiarity attend. there is no accident that ted kennedy
to tears. but that's not a hard thing because he's like speaker john boehner. [laughter] but the important thing is that his words spread throughout great britain, especially the phrase even to the end. he threw a lifeline to the british people and they never forgot it. during that time he was in england, there was a period of six weeks that he stayed with subsequent visits to the country during the war. hopkins would stay with winston churchill's country house. clementine was famous for not being prone to get along with people that she did not know. he was very discriminating. but she got along famously with hopkins. he had a good sense of humor and she was amused by his constant complaints to her about it she long underwear. so he would be in the downstairs bathroom shivering in his long overcoat that was made of wool and his scarf and hat. working on his memos and cable. and she would mother him at night. he would be kept up well over night drinking brandy. she would put a hot water bottle between the sheets, which she did. and she was entranced by hopkins touch with her often grumpy hu
us. .. it is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you, john. good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. there were two bills at national review and in the conservative movement. two bills. bill buckley, a brilliant shooting star who lit up the sky and william rusher, and never wavering north star by which conservatives learned to chart their political course. many have written about william f. buckley jr. that irresistible renaissance man, but no one until david frisk has given us an in-depth portrait of the other bill, william rusher. who among his other solutes for contributions played a pivotal role in the life of the national draft goldwater committee. that was critical because if there had been no draft goldwater committee there would have been no presidential candidate barry goldwater in 1964 and if there had been no candidate goldwater in 1964, there would have been no president-elect ronald reagan in 1980. it was goldwater who approved reagan's famous a time for choosing television address which made reagan political star overnight and led to his running for governor of califor
context, the national interest of your country. what john bose. millennium john's account. that was one of the more creative things we have done. it is bigger than that. until we get a president that does that, then is able to implement, by the way in partnership with the congress, doesn't mean the congress has to agree with everything but you can't treat article i of the constitution like it is an appendix, like it is a nuisance. if for no other reason you can't sustain a foreign-policy, you can't sustain a war, the people of america, 70% consistently are gone in iraq. you can prove or disprove that. those are not my numbers. it is over. it is over like it is a matter of how we get out now. you have got to have a policy that the american people understand, make sense for the country and will sustain. that requires partnership. >> thank you very much. appreciate your time. [applause] >> thank you all for coming out tonight. appreciate it. [inaudible conversations] >> tell us what you think about our programming this weekend. you can tweet us at booktv, comment on our facebook call or se
out to coca-cola. they have a twitter account that is doc pemberton. it's, dr. john pemberton is the pharmacist who invented coca-cola. so now they have the twitter page for him. he speaks in old-timey language and talks about riding on horses. so i sent him a drawing that i had dope when i was a child. -- done when i was a child. when i was 8 years old, i was still into coca-cola. i sent him a picture, and he said, oh, that's great. i wonder what you can do now? so i sent him another picture of a pemberton wipe coca-cola bottle. there was actually alcohol in it. alcohol was prohibited before cocaine was in georgia at the time, so they had to take the alcohol out. that's when they added the caffeine to give you an extra kick, and the that was the west african cola nut. hence, the coca and the cola. so i sent him that picture, and he's like, oh, that's great too. i love it. don't show the polar bears, they might go after you. basically, i was trying to reel him in because, actually, i have another question about the single convention on narcotic drugs -- [laughter] and how do y
, probably the worst dog in history, john kennedy, followed closely by lyndon johnson, there's ample opportunity. i may have to stretch the to e three or four. [laughter] perhaps the series will send my kids to college. so thanks for that. yes. >> during your historical research, have you discovered similar stories about the private lives of justices of the supreme court, or are they just above reproach? >> yeah, okay. the question about the private lives of justices of the supreme court and other politicians. like i said, the more things change. what you find is throughout history the drama, the plot stays the same in this great production of history, the actors change. early presidents were struggling with issues of privacy. for example, john quip si adams' wife, she was a very private woman, and they had a poor marriage. they fought a lot. and she kind of blamed her husband for some problems the children had. one of the kids may have committed suicide or may have been drunk and fallen off a boat and drowned, we're not sure. so she blamed him and was angry about that. supreme court
. that was when my first teaching job a few years ago. i was a john wesley young research professor in the math department. >> great contributed to math and computer science. >> a great place to start your academic career. anyway, my thesis was written in probability. i didn't statistics also. i just wanted to make a few comments before coming to my question. you spent a lot of time in the book about -- i was teaching a business stat course which a colleague of mine described cynically as follows, i asked him what's the difference between business stat and sophisticated business stat course is one in which every observation and your data set has a dollar sign in front of it. anyway, i spent time -- you can't prove simple limit theorem in a basic course. beautiful mathematics but you are just way over the heads of students. but anyway, you can get an intuitive description of what the theorem says. it was my reward after doing that, student evaluations at the end of the semester. professor, you talk too much. you explain to much. cut out the smalltalk, just give us the formulas. and so, i mean, i
in the early 1980s when the president was ambassador hova, and john became a good friend and enlisted me into some projects. little did i realize that a few years from 1982-'83 i would be spending a lot of time here. and so i have some connection with this institution that goes back some time and have always admired the mission, the objective and what it does. i believe that this institution is as relevant and important today as it's ever been and maybe more so. stuart was very generous in his summary and review of my book which being the unabashed, gratuitous politician that i am -- [laughter] i'm not at all bashful about hawking it. but those of you who have written books, and many of you have -- and this is the first book, probably the only book i'll ever write -- i was not aware and still am not of how it all works. but i do know that you do not get rich on books unless you go into paperback rights and a number of other things. so we will not be e retiring soon -- retiring soon -- [laughter] from the book. let me begin where stuart left off, and if you would give me just a couple of
such as jane goodall goodall, bill moyers, and supreme court justice john paul stevens. go to the web site at progressive forum houston .org. we're glad to give away free books just a year negative sure your ticket stub. supreme or rules to not allow us to discuss court cases of the past, present, or future but we will delved deep into her fascinating story. justice sotomayor will sign books and greet fans in the grand foyer. i cried when i read "my beloved world" and i also left. it is a good book. i believe it will be more than a best seller but because of a passive american success story required reading in his closing colleges i am amazed at the evils we have been getting from houston students filled with exclamation point saw. urine people connect with sonia sotomayor. in her book i was especially impressed of her and her brother as kids doing their homework with their mother who was also doing her's steading to becoming a registered nurse. two generations encouraging each other. to me, justice sotomayor success story should replace should replace the ratio alger myth from determinati
john paul stevens. just go to our web site at houston.org. that is progressive forum houston.org. we are pleased to give a book to every attendee tonight. just show your ticket at the distribution table in the grand foyer. additional books are also on sale in the grand foyer by blue willow bookshop. after justice sotomayor's presentation she will join me for a q&a. i should say that supreme court rules don't allow us to discuss court cases of the past, present or future but we will delve deeply into her fascinating story. justice sotomayor will sign books and greet fans in the grand foyer. i cried when i read "my beloved world," and i also laughed. it is a good book. i believe it will be more than a bestseller. it will become a classic american success story and required reading in high schools and colleges. i am amazed at the e-mails we have been getting from houston students filled with exclamation points. young people connect with sonia sotomayor. in her book, i was especially impressed by the scene of sonia and her brother junior as kids doing their homework with their mother, wh
. >> are you planning on going back very soon? >> yes. [laughter] >> so, i understand that why clough john started a foundation and raised an enormous amount of money. the money disappeared. he is under investigation. can you give some substance to that whole story? >> why clough is in the book as well. very interesting guy interesting character by his own right. the thing is best known for in the course of the story of 2010 is that he wanted to become president of the republic of haiti and actually mounted a very promising campaign until a last minute when he was left off the ballot. depending on who you ask. at that time his financial problems both personal and the party from haiti his charity ngo were factored into that. i would say interestingly enough even though he was quite common knowledge in haiti that there was a widespread allegations of unpaid taxes in misspent money that had gone to as a group, most people that i was talking to, the haitians who lived there, didn't really care all that much. they were much more interested in his promise as somebody basically who could lift the
was a newspaper boy. an honorable way to begin. it's so i got my start. he gets his first john upton at the daily "herald", an afternoon newspaper down and bollocks to gulfport purely serendipitously where i got my start. he portrays himself quite openly and but as a very gullible reporters. i certainly hope that when you bought the book and have had a chance to look at the you will be as entertaining as we were by some of his early stories of falling for ruses and having great faith that everyone was telling him the truth, as you find out later they weren't always telling the truth. of course, he then begins to develop a reputation that is very tough, hard-nosed investigative reporter which could soon be applicable * and sense and fleeing to the atlanta constitution where he continued to get be about. he did some just break through investigative reporter that we will hear about tonight. beyond that he was just terrific, shoot. he was just a great reporter. it's easy to overemphasize just that it was investigated. his career was also above standing for the first amendment he worked with a number
to have a real treat this morning. as john mentioned, i am a special forces officer by profession. so this area is near and dear to my heart. this is kind of what we do or did. it'll let me do it anymore. [laughter] i mentioned to max when he came in a little historical artifact in that when i was a cadet at west point i bought a book that had just been published. a two volume set. it was called war in the shadows , the guerrilla in history by robert aspirate. that book from 1975 until now really has been the sort of a benchmark for this kind of historical review of this subject area. that is a long time for a book tour keep that sort of position. well, with apologies, i think his book is being replaced not. max has done that. with this book which is on sale outside, invisible armies, he, i think, has set the new benchmark for the subject area. his book is very, very comprehensive. it is somewhat chronological, but not entirely. it is somewhat regional, but not entirely, and it is somewhat not functional is the right word, but topical, but not entirely. that sounds like it is not orga
that got me involved in all of this stuff, and john reid later on -- were both, i think, senate senate -- significant world financial leaders. as far as having talked with a lot of people, i think meeting mandela, having dealt with a number of cases, spent an hour in 1980 with fidel castro, he wanted my advice on how to restructure the cuban debt, and he said i can speak to you about that because we nationalized you in cuba, one of the first times we nationalized foreign banks, and then you offset on our reserves. so, you know, we're kind of even here. and this was in nicaragua with orr ortega who was running the sandinista government who's now back again putting this together. certainly fascinating there. i mean, i could run through so many people. i had to, one of the sessions with mandela i was asked to tell mr. mugabe who was then president of zimbabwe and is still president of zimbabwe that he'd used all his time up. and he wasn't very happy with that. and because of that, i was able to do that, our secretary of commerce, ron brown, asked me if i would chair at the 50th anniversar
got me involved in all of this, and john reed later on. were both i think significant world financial leaders. as far as having talked with a lot of people like, i think meeting mondello, having dealt with a number of cases, spent an hour in 1980 with fidel castro. he wanted my advice on how to restructure the cuban debt. and he said i can speak to you about that because we nationalize you in cuba, one of the first time who did was nationalist the foreign banks, and then you offset our reserves. so we're kind of evening. this was in nicaragua. certainly fascinating. i mean, i could run through so many people. one of the sessions with mondello, i was asked to tell mr. mole gabi, who was then president of zimbabwe and as the president of zimbabwe that he used all his time. he wasn't very happy with that. because of that i was able to do that our secretary of commerce ron brown asked me if i would cheer at the 50th anniversary in admissions the africa lunch that the us was getting at that time, which it did because he said look, if you can do that, then you can take everything else. so i
, working with walter, and he is the one who got me involved in all of this. john reed later on. we are both, i think, significant world financial leaders. as far as having talked with a lot of people, i think meeting mandela, having dealt with a number of cases, spent an hour in 1980 with fidel castro. he wanted my advice on how to restructure the cuban debt. i said to mike and speak to you about that because we nationalized you in cuba. one of the first tax we did was nationalized the human bank. and then we're kind of even year. and this was in nicaragua. in fact, running the sandinista government, now back again running the corona where, he put us together. and certainly fascinating there. i mean, i could run through so many people. i have to up -- one of the sessions with mandela, i was asked to tell mr. mcgrath the who was then president of zimbabwe and still president of zimbabwe who had used dollars timeout. he was not very happy with that. because of that, i was able to do that. our secretary of commerce asked me if i would share the 50th anniversary of the united nations, the effor
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)